Being a Busy “B” won’t get you promoted

Do you know Michael who’s working with you?
He’s the guy that usually eats his lunch while running from one meeting room to another, he’s the guy who’s always last to leave the office, he’s this guy that won an iPad at the company yearly conference for his “great achievements”.

Michael is a Busy Bee, or better said – a Busy “B”.

There are 3 types of employees:
“A”s – those who set the rules
“B”s – those who follow the rules
“C”s – those who don’t get the rules

Michael is the perfect employee – he gets things done, managers love him, and when the shit hits the fan, he’ll be there to save the day.

Generally speaking, Michael likes his job. It “challenges” him, he thinks… 
Yes, like any other jobs he’s dealing with many boring day to day tasks and really wishes to take a leadership position one time in the future (although he’s not entirely sure what does it really mean).
He feels that he’s getting a good progress in his personal career – he’s learning new stuff and he had even attended a couple of meetings with the company’s CEO over the past year. But yet, he still worries he’s lacking enough ‘field’ experience in order to walk the extra mile.

Michael’s career is stuck. 
It’s stuck because he has the perfect skills to walk on the path, but he unfortunately can’t draw the path. 
He’ll probably be moving horizontally eventually – replacing Stephanie who’s going on a maternity leave soon, but it will be the third time he’s taking this direction.

How would he break the glass ceiling?
He thought to talk to his manager about it, but was too shy, and the 15 minute weekly meeting with her – ended up covering only the burning issues, as always.
He’s full of ideas, but his manager never takes them seriously, stating that he should focus on his current job first.

In order to take the extra step, Michael will need to OWN the leadership and not to wait for someone to hand it over to him.

While employees struggled to finish their micro tasks, companies actually are longing for true leaders to look at the big picture and set their courses.

If you’ve got the passion, you’ve got the energy to make a difference – don’t wait for someone to hand you the time to do it. Just do it.

Don’t ask permission, ask forgiveness. 
People don’t get fired, for taking a lead and failing, and if you do – remember it’s not a company worth working for from the start.

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